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dc.contributor.advisorWaigandt, Alexen
dc.contributor.authorWoolsey, Conrad L., 1981-en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.submitted2007 Summeren
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on December 18, 2007)en_US
dc.descriptionVita.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Educational and counseling psychology.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe three main purposes of this study were (a) to determine the quantity-frequency rates of alcohol use, combined use (using an energy drink within plus or minus four hours of consuming alcohol), and energy drink use in a population of D-I athletes, (b) to compare reported risk taking behaviors and negative health consequences within combined users (n = 132), and (c) to investigate differences between men and women on reported risk taking behaviors. A total of 401 student athletes from a large Division I university participated in the study. From the complete Quick Drink Screen (QDS) sample of 401 athletes, 315 or 78.55% used alcohol, 150 or 37.41% combined, and 194 or 48.62% used energy drinks within the past year. Results indicated that combined users consumed significantly more alcohol than athletes that used alcohol only. However, combined users consumed nearly double the amount of alcohol when they did not combine energy drinks with alcohol. Yet, results of the Brief Comprehensive Effects of Alcohol (B-CEOA) and Combined Use (B-CEOCU) expectancy measures still indicated that when athletes combined they took significantly more risks and experienced significantly more negative consequences. Results also indicated that men took significantly more risks than women while drinking alcohol only and combining.en_US
dc.identifier.merlin.b61532514en_US
dc.identifier.oclc184844212en_US
dc.identifier.otherWoolseyC-071207-D7933en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4869
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2007 Freely available dissertations (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2007 Dissertations
dc.subject.lcshNational Collegiate Athletic Association. -- Division Ien_US
dc.subject.lcshCollege athletes -- Alcohol useen_US
dc.subject.lcshRisk-taking (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshEnergy drinksen_US
dc.titleA study of NCAA division I athletes on the use and the effects of combining alcohol & energy drinksen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational, school, and counseling psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US


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