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dc.contributor.advisorPlacier, Peggyeng
dc.contributor.authorWillis, Barbara G., 1950-eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on October 15, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.description.abstractPublicly available archives of an internet discussion list for people who operate disability service offices at colleges and universities across the U.S. provided a unique insight into the values, interactions, and norms of this professional group. This study critically analyzed the discourse practices of this community. In and through their online interactions, these professionals define and construct the concept of "disability", attitudes toward students with psychiatric disabilities, and ideological positions on "reasonable" accommodations on the part of their institutions. It was found that some of these professionals are talking in a way that can bring harm to the subjects of their discussions ; it is important that this practice is revealed and remedies are taken. The analysis has provided many examples of how psychiatric disability is socially constructed as well as several examples of the decisionmaking process for accommodations. These features included unbalanced posting patterns, attempts at closure of discussions or debates, invoking greater expertise-experience or the Grand Discourse of law, and allowing misinformation, sarcastic humor, and damaging stereotypes to go unchallenged. The presence of hegemonic discourse in an archived list dedicated to disability support services in higher education has been confirmed. The use of power by DSS officials that results in prejudicial and discriminatory treatment of students with psychiatric disabilities was indicated by the discourse.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb60464677eng
dc.identifier.oclc174144135eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4874eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4874
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshCollege students with disabilities -- Services foreng
dc.subject.lcshCollege students with disabilitieseng
dc.subject.lcshDiscrimination against the mentally illeng
dc.subject.lcshHealth services accessibilityeng
dc.subject.lcshAccessible Web sites for people with disabilitieseng
dc.titleDiscourse as a normative instrument : analysis of mental illness on a disability services discussion listeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysis (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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