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dc.contributor.advisorSperber, Jonathan, 1952-eng
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Joel, 1976-eng
dc.coverage.spatialGermany -- Bavariaeng
dc.coverage.temporal1900-1999eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on September 20, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- History.eng
dc.description.abstractAfter twelve years of Nazi rule and with Germany in total ruin, the Catholic and Protestant churches sought to re-Christianize German society. Bringing Germans back to Christ was seen as the only way to make good on the Nazi past and ward off any future slips into political radicalism of either the left or right. These efforts centered on three core topics: regular worship attendance, confessional schooling for children, and an "ordained" marital life. This dissertation examines the theoretical foundations and practical applications of these efforts as well as their reception by the laity. It is the first to proceed on such a course of study across specifically cross-confessional contexts. The research for this dissertation was conducted in Bavarian church archives. Results indicate that confessional tension was far more widespread than many have believed. Furthermore, mass consumerism helped create an ethos of individualism that severely undermined the shared experiences of traditional Christian communities and the moral authority of the churches. This work helps define the specific place of churches and religion in the post-1945 world. It examines how the culture of consumption that arose after World War II affected existing religious customs and mores. Finally, it shows the possibilities and shortcomings of ecumenicalism.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb5962694xeng
dc.identifier.oclc173185764eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4884
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4884eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshChurch renewaleng
dc.subject.lcshChristianityeng
dc.subject.lcshChristian unioneng
dc.subject.lcshBavaria (Germany) -- Church historyeng
dc.titleRebuilding the soul: churches and religion in Bavaria, 1945-1960eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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