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dc.contributor.advisorRowlett, Ralph M.eng
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Matthew L.eng
dc.coverage.spatialLuxembourg -- Titelberg Siteeng
dc.coverage.temporalTo 768eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.description9 unnumbered blank pages at end of manuscript.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on November 5, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Anthropology.eng
dc.description.abstractThe Titelberg in modern Luxembourg was not only the largest oppidum of the late Iron Age in Gallia Belgica, but the most long-lived, with occupations from La Tène II continuous for centuries, ultimately prospering due to copper and iron ore resources as a mint and industrial center before and after Gallo-Roman contact, until eclipsed by larger centers. During the middle of the first century AD, the mint was razed, not to be rebuilt, and the population dwindled. After an interval of perhaps three hundred years, a new smelting furnace was built into the remains of the Gallo-Roman Minting Foundry; excavation shows this smelter was used to melt down bronze coins and artifacts for reuse or as bullion. The questions arise from this, then: who was doing this and why? In the latter fourth century AD, were Franks moving into the territory and exploiting easy resources, or was this another example of continuity? Was the recycling process due to economic and political woes or was there a deeper reason? There is sufficient evidence to hypothesize continuity, with a local populace accustomed to accommodation, and a burgeoning economy fueling itself through a hunger for metal.eng
dc.identifier.merlin.b61262213eng
dc.identifier.oclc180709613eng
dc.identifier.otherShawM-050407-T6309eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4897eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2007 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2007 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshBronze coinseng
dc.subject.lcshTitelberg Site (Luxembourg) -- Antiquities, Celticeng
dc.subject.lcshTitelberg Site (Luxembourg) -- Antiquities, Romaneng
dc.subject.lcshLa Tène periodeng
dc.subject.lcshFranks -- Historyeng
dc.subject.lcshSmeltingeng
dc.subject.lcshExcavations (Archaeology)eng
dc.titleThe north smelter at Titelberg: post-imperial bronze recycling in Belgic Gauleng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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