"The art of printing shall endure": journalism, community, and identity in New York City, 1800-1810

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"The art of printing shall endure": journalism, community, and identity in New York City, 1800-1810

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4906

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dc.contributor.advisor Pasley, Jeffrey L., 1964- en
dc.contributor.author Smith, Steven C., 1981- en_US
dc.coverage.spatial New York (State) -- New York
dc.coverage.temporal 1800-1899 en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-01-12T19:05:54Z
dc.date.available 2010-01-12T19:05:54Z
dc.date.issued 2007 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2007 Summer en
dc.identifier.other SmithS-072407-T8017 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4906
dc.description The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Title from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on January 10, 2008) en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Thesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- History. en_US
dc.description.abstract This thesis reconstructs the community of printers, booksellers, and bookbinders that existed in New York City in the first decade of the nineteenth-century. A close analysis of city directories published between 1800 and 1810 reveals that working-class artisans and merchants associated with the printing trade deliberately settled in Manhattan's Old East Ward by consciously choosing to open shops on certain streets as a result of their shared social and economic identities. This community, consisting of an area geographically bound by William Street and the East River docks, has been heretofore ignored by historians. This thesis asserts that the association of printers, booksellers, and bookbinders should be considered as a central category of analysis, and demonstrates that this community had a direct influence on early printing trade unionization, printing and publishing specialization, and political rivalries between newspaper editors such as James Cheetham, Peter Irving, and William Coleman. Thus, by utilizing sources such as directories, newspapers, pamphlets, speeches, journals, and letters, this thesis reinterprets the Habermasian public sphere as an actual public space - community of like-minded artisans and merchants who shared common identities through their association with New York City's printing trade, despite ideological barriers. Indeed, this thesis maintains that by looking at public discourse as part of an organic community - as opposed to a theoretical realm that exists only in conversation - a better understanding of print culture will emerge that will enrich the prevailing scholarly dialogue. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2007 Freely available theses (MU) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Printers -- History en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Booksellers and bookselling -- History en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Bookbinders -- History en_US
dc.title "The art of printing shall endure": journalism, community, and identity in New York City, 1800-1810 en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline History en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name M.A. en_US
thesis.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.identifier.merlin .b6175111x en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 190699599 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2007 Theses


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