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dc.contributor.advisorViator, John A.eng
dc.contributor.advisorCurry, Randy D.eng
dc.contributor.authorWhiteside, Paul James Douglaseng
dc.date.issued2015eng
dc.date.submitted2015 Springeng
dc.description.abstractContemporary laser delivery techniques utilized in clinical dermatology allow for a dangerous amount of high-intensity laser light to reflect off a multitude of surfaces, including the patient's skin. Seeing as this stray light poses a consistent threat to the safety of both patients and practitioners alike, the intention of this work was to develop a technique to mitigate the potential for adverse reflections by delivering the light directly into the tissue through physical contact with an optical waveguide. It is also anticipated that delivering the light directly into the tissue will aid in the mitigation of negative tissue effects by replacing the tissue-air interface with a tissue-waveguide interface, thereby encouraging thermal conductivity through the use of contact cooling modalities. The technique demonstrated herein represents a controlled method of laser delivery utilizing metal thin films to regulate energy delivery into the tissue.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/49141
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted to MOspace by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Studies.eng
dc.titlePhotonic ablation via quantum tunnelingeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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