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dc.contributor.advisorTownsend, Martha A.eng
dc.contributor.authorHarms, Aaron A.eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on March 27, 2008)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- English.eng
dc.description.abstractThis study began with some initial questions about the interaction between the Composition Program and the Writing Lab at the University of Missouri-Columbia, with the first-year composition student's navigation of that interaction as the point of inquiry. What were the motivations that students had as they began their coursework? Could those motivations change throughout the course of a semester and, if so, could the Writing Lab be seen as a catalyst for those changes? An adapted version of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) was made available to the students who were enrolled in English 1000 during the Fall semester of 2005. The students were asked to complete this survey at the beginning and end of the semester, and the campus Writing Lab's data on student usage was then matched with the results from each survey. The study was amended though, due to a lack of matched data sets. Sixty-six students completed the MSLQ survey for the pre-test, while only 42 completed the post-test. Only ten of the respondents were found to have utilized the Writing Lab as well as having participated in both the pre-test and post-test. Because of this small sample size, a "student centered" set of questions was developed, in order to collect more data from the individuals who had completed all parts of the initial method. Three of the students further articulated their experiences in and out of class through these sets of interview questions. While there were no statistically significant correlations between Writing Lab usage and the student responses to the MSLQ, both the quantitative data and the additional qualitative responses serve to point in particular directions for further research in Composition, such as student understanding of the services provided for them, as well as the requirements and demands for their courses in conjunction with those services.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb62996988eng
dc.identifier.oclc214282671eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4933
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4933eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2007 Theseseng
dc.subjectmotivated strategies for learning questionnaire; MSLQ.eng
dc.subjectmotivated strategies for learning questionnaire; MSLQeng
dc.subject.lcshComposition (Language arts)eng
dc.subject.lcshEnglish language -- Composition and exerciseseng
dc.subject.lcshWriting centerseng
dc.titleFirst-year composition and writing center usageeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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