[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorPearce, Tola Oluen
dc.contributor.authorHeller, Jenniferen_US
dc.coverage.spatialNorth America
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springen
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on October 26, 2007)en_US
dc.descriptionVita.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Sociology.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne job of social scientists is to parse out partial knowledge from every relevant social location in order to present a structural interpretation of social phenomena. A textual and content analysis was performed on both academic texts and internet blogs that discusses white privilege from a lower class white social location to gain an emic and etic perspective and to discover if a disconnect between knowledge claims exist between the two perspectives. The analysis of emic texts revealed four themes: (1) White privilege contributed a lack of understanding that whites could legitimately be poor (2) Group boundaries were constructed between racial minorities and non-poor whites (3) White privilege does not exist for the emic and (4) Some understanding of the intersection with gender and social class was evident. A content and textual analyses of academic texts lead to the discovery of three patterns (1) Whites from various classes were compared only to lower class racial minorities (2) Lower class whites emically adopted a vicarious status with the help of their racial privilege to improve their material situation and (3) the emic complained about class oppression is it was judged that the gap between them and racial minorities was too small. The analysis revealed that the emic lower class white perspective included a partial understanding of white privilege because class and gender oppression must be taken into account for a more accurate understanding. Implications of the study suggest that intersectionality must be incorporated in the etic analysis, and when it is included more effort to parse out partial knowledge must be made.en_US
dc.identifier.merlin.b61071997en_US
dc.identifier.oclc177168293en_US
dc.identifier.otherHellerJ-050407-T7216en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4946
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2007 Freely available theses (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2007 Theses
dc.subject.lcshPoor whites -- Economic aspectsen_US
dc.subject.lcshWorking class whites -- Economic aspectsen_US
dc.subject.lcshWorking class -- Education (Higher)en_US
dc.subject.lcshCollege teachers -- Social conditionsen_US
dc.subject.lcshSocial classesen_US
dc.titleAcademic and white working class perceptions of the economic aspects of white privilegeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyeng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record