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dc.contributor.advisorHuneycutt, Lois L.eng
dc.contributor.authorSwaters, Rebecca L.eng
dc.coverage.spatialIrelandeng
dc.coverage.temporalTo 500eng
dc.coverage.temporalTo 1172eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on January 10, 2008)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- History.eng
dc.description.abstractThere exists no economic study of prehistoric Ireland, nor a history focused on the island's early international relations, nor one that studies how its early elites came to power. This study seeks to bridge that gap by examining the use of international trade as a mechanism for gaining and maintaining power in prehistoric and early Christian Ireland, and how changing settlement patterns reflects the developing social complexity in Ireland. The study begins with brief discussions of Irish historiography and theories of statebuilding, including the use of war, resource scarcity, and other situations of advantage. The author then traces the nature and degree of international trade and foreign contacts Ireland maintained with the outside world between 2500 BCE and the sixth century CE. Changes in trade and foreign contacts were used to infer the relative growth of power held internally by the ruling classes of Ireland who controlled such international relations. This evidence was correlated with environmental circumstances, evidence for warfare, changing settlement patterns, large building projects, and road-building over the same period. Overall, trade was successfully used as a tool for gaining and maintaining power, while at the same time internal defenses, warfare, and building projects reflect the development of a complex social hierarchy. Ultimately, by the end of the sixth century CE, Ireland had developed an island-wide, cohesive social system.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb61751467eng
dc.identifier.oclc190761261eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4959
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4959eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshIndustries, Prehistoric -- Irelandeng
dc.subject.lcshIreland -- Commerce -- Great Britaineng
dc.subject.lcshIreland -- Economic conditionseng
dc.subject.lcshPower (Social sciences) -- Historyeng
dc.subject.lcshIreland -- Civilizationeng
dc.titleExchange and settlement patterns as evidence for social stratification and developing complexity in prehistoric and early Christian Irelandeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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