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dc.contributor.advisorBarrett, Bruce A.eng
dc.contributor.authorKeesey, Ian W.eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on November 11, 2008)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Entomology.eng
dc.description.abstractChestnut trees were once a dominant sight across the deciduous forest of the eastern and central United States, but following a devastating blight in the early 1900's much of the native range for this tree species has been lost. As interest in the restoration of the American chestnut tree increases, and as commercial production of chestnut fruit is being developed using blight resistant cultivars from Asia, a large quantity of both native and hybridized trees are coming into maturity and nut production across the United States. The two weevil species in the United States, the greater chestnut weevil (Curculio caryatrypes, Boheman) and the lesser chestnut weevil (Curculio sayi, Gyllenhal) attack ripening chestnut fruit, and they can devastate a chestnut operation. Of these two species, the lesser chestnut weevil (C. sayi) has long been reported as the most common and most damaging chestnut pest insect species. Our study shows a bimodal emergence pattern for C. sayi, a finding not previously documented for this species of chestnut weevil. Emergence patterns were consistent over the three years of this study, with the largest numbers of adults appearing in May and September each year. Underground study results indicate a minimum of 15 months in larval diapause prior to adult development for C. sayi. Most of the larvae emerged as adults in the second year, though some may hold over to emerge the third year. The flight ability of C. sayi allows them to travel up to 3 kilometers in a single flight, though average distances per flight were closer to 500 meters. There were no major differences in flight ability between the genders. This study lays the basic biological and ecological ground work required for continued research into C. sayi, and for the establishment of educated pest management.eng
dc.identifier.merlin.b65265038eng
dc.identifier.oclc271017113eng
dc.identifier.otherKeeseyI-120707-T8417eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/5028eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2007 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2007 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshAmerican chestnuteng
dc.subject.lcshAmerican chestnut -- Diseases and pestseng
dc.subject.lcshChestnut weevils -- Managementeng
dc.titleThe seasonal occurrence, soil distribution and flight characteristics of Curculio sayi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in mid-Missourieng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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