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dc.contributor.advisorGalat, David L.eng
dc.contributor.authorRidenour, Claytoneng
dc.coverage.spatialMissouri Rivereng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on January 8, 2008)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Fisheries and wildlife.eng
dc.description.abstractPopulations of many native big-river fishes have declined since channelization and flow regulation contributed to losses of shallow-water habitat (SWH) on lower Missouri River (LMOR). Existing point and wing-dike sandbars represent a potentially important source of SWH to fishes during early ontogeny within the main channel of LMOR. Small-bodied fishes were sampled using pre-positioned electrofishing devices from 0.0-0.5 m water depths adjacent to four point and four wing-dike sandbars on LMOR between July and October, 2005. A suite of associated environmental factors were also measured. Habitat use and assemblage structure relative to three spatial (sandbar type, region within sandbars, and distance from shoreline within region) and two temporal (month, diel), and environmental factors were evaluated using Analysis of Variance, Detrended Correspondence Analysis, and Canonical Correspondence Analysis. Samples yielded 49 species from 13 families in depths 0.0-0.5 m; most fishes were [lesser than or equal to]105 mm TL. Fish mean length increased but abundance decreased from July to October. Ordination analyses revealed that the assemblage was organized into bodylength subgroups. Fish assemblages were not different between point and wing-dike sandbars. Instead, fishes aligned along a depth-velocity gradient relative to body length. Shallow (ca. 0.12m), near-shore areas were dominated by fishes [lesser than] 35 mm TL during the day, but larger fishes (e.g., 70 mm TL) moved nearer to shore at night. This research shows that main-channel sandbars provide nursery to many fluvial fishes during early ontogeny and that sandbars play an important role as nursery in large regulated rivers.eng
dc.identifier.merlin.b61743707eng
dc.identifier.oclc190648291eng
dc.identifier.otherRidenourC-072707-T7980eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/5076eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2007 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2007 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshFishes -- Habitat -- Missouri Rivereng
dc.subject.lcshFishes -- Infancy -- Habitat -- Missouri Rivereng
dc.subject.lcshOntogenyeng
dc.subject.lcshSediment transporteng
dc.subject.lcshLand-water ecotoneseng
dc.subject.lcshSand barseng
dc.titleAssemblage structure and shallow-water habitat use by small-bodied fishes at lower Missouri River sandbarseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineFisheries and wildlife sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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