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dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Bruce A.eng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.description"New 8/94; Revised 6/10; Reprinted 1/12/1M."eng
dc.description.abstractWhiteflies are closely related to aphids, mealybugs and scale, all of which feed by sucking sap from plants. Whiteflies can be found on the undersides of leaves and are active during the daytime when the temperature is warm. When a heavily infested plant is disturbed, white clouds of winged adults fly into the air. Some species of whiteflies can become serious pests of certain vegetable crops, greenhouse plants or ornamental plants. Two of the most important species are the greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum, and the sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. In colder climates, whiteflies die outdoors, but in warmer climates, as well as indoors and in greenhouses, they can reproduce throughout the year with several overlapping generations.eng
dc.format.extent2 pages ; illustrationseng
dc.identifier.otherG-7275-2012eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/51176
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri Extensioneng
dc.relation.ispartofLawn and Gardeneng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionMU Extension publicationseng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesG - Agricultural Guides (University of Missouri--Columbia. Extension) ; 7275-2012eng
dc.rightsArchive version. For the most recent information see extension.missouri.edu.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectbiology ; damage ; honeydew ; mold ; control ; cultural ; biologica ; mechanical ; chemicaleng
dc.titleManaging whiteflies on indoor and outdoor plantseng
dc.typeDocumenteng


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