The items in this collection are the theses and dissertations written by students of the Department of English. Some items may be viewed only by members of the University of Missouri System and/or University of Missouri-Columbia. Click on one of the browse buttons above for a complete listing of the works.

Recent Submissions

  • Tudor prose satire : the dynamics of a visual mode 

    Gresham, Stephen L. (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1975)
    "Peter Bruegel’s Dulle Griet (”Mad Meg”) is a collage of feverish movement replete with monstrous figures, absurd concoctions, and soberly aggressive peasant women. A besieged village forms the lower half of the setting ...
  • The other side of the window : an essay on structural iconography in English and American fiction 

    Lawson, Jessie Edminster (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1978)
    The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the structural and symbolic function of the window as a major motif in certain works of nineteenth- and twentieth-century English and American fiction. Within this body ...
  • Sir Philip Sidney : contrasting views on the value and morality of rhetoric and poetry 

    Stanford, Charles L. (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1978)
    Sidney’s attitude toward rhetoric passes through three rather distinct stages. At first, he is quite positive toward it, treats it with respect, and, what is perhaps even more important, with enthusiasm. His attitude toward ...
  • A model for the analysis of cohesion and information management in published writing in three disciplines 

    Lovejoy, Kim Brian (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1987)
    This study proposes a model to compare cohesion and information management in samples of professional writing in three disciplines (counseling psychology, biology, and history). When tested with the chi-square procedure, ...
  • The public voice of Richard Crashaw : a study in the use of religious tradition 

    Cooper, Robert M. (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1973)
    "It is something of an understatement to say that of all the poets of the seventeenth century, Crashaw has been most subjected to the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. He has suffered the fate of being labeled the ...
  • The centrique part : John Donne's Elegies 

    Johnson, Jeffrey Stephens (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1987)
    "An extended study of the Elegies of John Donne is long overdue. Beyond such notable exceptions as "Going to Bed," "The Perfume," and "The Bracelet," the Elegies, overall, constitute a neglected area of Donne's canon. In ...
  • Frederick Buechner : an introduction 

    Brown, W. Dale (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1987)
    American writer Frederick Buechner has published, since 1950, eleven novels and ten major works of non-fiction. The critical reception of Buechner’s work has been generally problematic; his work has been undervalued, at ...
  • Australian narratives and Charles Dickens - retelling the history of the transport convict network 

    Sossamon, Jefferson Dewey (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2023)
    The practice of exile reached its zenith in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries when the British Empire utilized transportation to remove criminal offenders elsewhere. From late 1787 to early 1788, the First Fleet ...
  • Hiding in plain sight : anonymity across adaptations of Miklos Laszlo's Illatszertar (Parfumerie) 

    Moum, Amy J (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2023)
    Director Ernst Lubitsch's romantic comedy film The Shop Around the Corner has inspired multiple adaptations since its release in 1940. In it, two shop clerks fall in love through anonymous letters while detesting each other ...
  • The Monstrous Ordinary : the erasure of the women of Weird Tales and the implications for monster theory 

    Mandelbaum, Jolie Anne (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2023)
    [EMBARGOED UNTIL 12/1/2024] My dissertation offers a new approach to monstrosity, called the Monstrous Ordinary, which articulates monstrosity not as something new, different, or aberrant, but originating from the normal, ...
  • Middleton's dramaturgy : a study of the major comedies 

    Zappen, James Philip (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1974)
    "Throughout a career covering most of the first quarter of the seventeenth century, Thomas Middleton produced a body of work remarkable for both its quantity and variety. Those features of Middleton's work are nowhere more ...
  • English literature and modern Bengali short fiction : a study in influences 

    Lago, Mary McClelland (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1969)
    Modern short fiction is defined as a genre which deals, by means of a process of oblique questioning, with the concerns of "submerged population groups." Because answers to these questions are not necessarily supplied by ...
  • A study of the structures of Shakespeare's three parts of Henry VI 

    Ricks, Don M. (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1965)
    "The purpose of this study is, therefore, to isolate and describe Shakespeare’s achievement in each of the Henry VI plays. The emphasis throughout will be upon the Shakespearean structure, the "new organ of thought" resulting ...
  • Frost and Thoreau : a study in affinities 

    Domina, Lyle D. (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1968)
    Although a few critics have posited Henry David Thoreau as a conscious influence on Robert Frost, the purpose of this study is to demonstrate a significant set of affinities in the thought and attitudes of the two men. For ...
  • The speaker in the major poems of William Cowper 

    Morgan, David Conrad (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1968)
    "The fate of William Cowper as poet may very well turn out to be analogous to what threatened to be the fate of Samuel Johnson: the history of the man will become more important than his literary achievement. Of course the ...
  • The character of Gawain in English literature 

    Leible, Arthur Bray (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1961)
    There are thus three basic areas of investigation: Celtic tales and traditions, culminating in the work of Geoffrey of Monmouth; medieval metrical and prose romances, both French and English; and English prose and poetry ...
  • The dramas and prose works of John Rastell 

    Geritz, Albert J (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1976)
    A study of the literary career of John Rastell (1475- 1536), Thomas More's brother-in-law, this dissertation re-evaluates and adds insights to previous scholarly work. Its purposes are to collect and evaluate published and ...
  • "To move wild laughter in the throat of death" : an anatomy of Black Humor 

    Freisinger, Randall R. (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1975)
    This dissertation presents an extended definition of a literary genre that has been labelled "Black Humor" by many contemporary critics. Though the phrase has been used with increasing frequency in the last ten years, it ...
  • The serialized novels of Sinclair Lewis : a comparative analysis of periodical and book 

    Bucco, Martin (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1963)
    Of Sinclair Lewis's twenty-two novels, seven were serialized in various popular magazines before they were published in book form. Of these seven only Arrowsmith has been subjected to comparative analysis of the serial and ...
  • Clyomon and Clamydes a critical edition 

    Littleton, Betty J. (University of Missouri--Columbia., 1962)
    "Sir Clyomon and Sir Clamydes (Greg, Bibliography, no. 157) was printed by Thomas Creede in 1599--the same year he printed the second quarto of Romeo and Juliet and Greene's Alphonsus, King of Aragon. Like Creede's other ...

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