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dc.contributor.authorPray, Carl E. (Carl Esek)eng
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Jikuneng
dc.coverage.spatialChinaeng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.description.abstractDespite making enormous strides in reducing poverty, hunger, and malnutrition, China still has large numbers of people who do not consume sufficient micronutrients such as iron, zinc and Vitamin A. To meet this need, government agencies in China are supporting programs in industrial fortification and vitamin supplements. In recent years the government has also supported research on biofortification of major grain crops using both conventional plant breeding and transgenic techniques. The article assesses the potential political barriers to the acceptance of biofortified crops and concludes that biofortification using nontransgenic techniques would probably not face much opposition, while biofortification with transgenic techniques might have a more difficult time. The article then assesses which groups in China are likely to support or oppose biofortification and then proposes some strategies that the government and international agencies might use if they decide to support biofortification.eng
dc.identifier.citationAgBioForum, 10(3): 161-169.eng
dc.identifier.issn1522-936Xeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/54eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherAgBioForumeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionAgBioForum, vol. 10, no. 3 (2007)eng
dc.subjectfood fortificationeng
dc.subjectbiofortificationeng
dc.subjectbiotechnologyeng
dc.subject.lcshGenetically modified foods -- Public opinioneng
dc.subject.lcshEnriched foods -- Public opinioneng
dc.titleBiofortification for China: Political Responses to Food Fortification and GM Technology, Interest Groups, and Possible Strategieseng
dc.typeArticleeng


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