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dc.contributor.advisorAubrey, Jennifer Stevenseng
dc.contributor.authorCherry, Kristin L., 1972-eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on June 2, 2009)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2008.eng
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this research was to understand the relationship between viewer motives for watching reality TV, reality TV exposure, and interpersonal relationship perceptions. The interpersonal relationship perceptions that were examined included: attachment styles, love styles, and machiavellianism. Watching for positive outcomes was positively related to reality TV viewing and watching for interpersonal outcomes was negatively related. While controlling for overall TV viewing, reality TV was found to be positively associated with a game-playing and cunning view of relationships, and negatively related to an avoidant attachment style. Watching reality shows with traditional values was negatively related to a game-playing perspective of love, and watching half-hour network dating shows was positively related to this game-playing perspective. Watching reality shows that were filmed in a documentary style was positively related to a cunning view of relationships. Reality TV was found to mediate the relationship between motives and outcomes in three models: first, between interpersonal motives and machiavellianism; second, between positive outcomes and the avoidant attachment style; and third, between interpersonal motives and the avoidant attachment style. Interpersonal attraction and perceived reality were not found to moderate the relationship between motives for watching reality TV and interpersonal relationship perceptions. Focus group interviews further explained these findings.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb68654972eng
dc.identifier.oclc368283269eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5532eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5532
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshReality television programseng
dc.subject.lcshInterpersonal relationseng
dc.titleReality TV and interpersonal relationship perceptionseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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