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dc.contributor.advisorSher, Kenneth J.eng
dc.contributor.authorRosinski, Jenny M., 1977-eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on July 29, 2009)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description.abstractNumerous typologies of alcoholics have been proposed, dating back to the 1850s. However, many of these typologies have categorized alcoholics on distal and/or static etiological factors. In this study, longitudinal data collected on nine occasions over four years were used to derive and validate a typology based on a more proximal etiological factor (i.e., drinking motives) and change over time in heavy alcohol involvement. Data were taken from an incoming undergraduate sample ([nu] = 3,720 at baseline). Mixture models of heavy alcohol involvement, coping motives, and enhancement motives, resulted in seven groups of individuals with distinct on patterns over time on these variables. Membership in any class other than the group characterized by the lowest levels of heavy alcohol use and drinking motives was predicted by several common risk factors (i.e., extraversion, symptoms of conduct disorder and drug dependence, Greek membership, and perceived peer alcohol involvement), as well as risk factors related specifically to levels of heavy drinking (i.e., male sex and parental education) or drinking motives (i.e., neuroticism and conscientiousness) in each class. Use of typological approaches that incorporate both alcohol consumption as well as motivational factors may aid in the identification of at-risk drinkers and inform specialized prevention and treatment efforts.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb70589884eng
dc.identifier.oclc428441970eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5535
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5535eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshCollege students -- Alcohol useeng
dc.subject.lcshAlcoholicseng
dc.subject.lcshTypology (Psychology)eng
dc.subject.lcshDevelopmental psychology and motivationeng
dc.titleDerivation and validation of alcohol phenotypes in a college population: a motivational/developmental approacheng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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