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dc.contributor.advisorSmeda, R. J. (Reid John), 1960-eng
dc.contributor.authorBentivegna, Diego Javiereng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on July 22, 2009)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biological sciences.eng
dc.description.abstractCut-leaved leaved teasel is an invasive, exotic, and noxious weed in Missouri. Biennial plant infest roadsides and undisturbed areas. Studies regarding seed biology, detection, and control measures were conducted to improve teasel management along a four mile section of Highway interstate 70 in central Missouri. Seed characteristic such as viability after flowering, emergence pattern and persistence were conducted. Hyperspectral images were collected using airplane along I-70 to assess teasel infestation levels. Chemical control together with grass establishment was utilized to reduce severity of infestations. Cut-leaved teasel produced germinable seed 12 days after flowering. Seed emerged primarily in April and October with 31%. After three years under field conditions, seed viability was only 6.1%. Cut-leaved teasel can be detected among other species in a highway environment with greater 80% accuracy. Application of the herbicide aminopyralid in both May and October, combined with sowing tall fescue, Canada wildrye and buffalograss resulted in reducing infestations levels of cut-leaved teasel by greater 90%. The integration of biology, detection and control techniques lead to conduct the optimum suitable cut-leaved management plan.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb70560018eng
dc.identifier.oclc427388504eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5549
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5549eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshDipsacaceae -- Controleng
dc.subject.lcshWeeds -- Controleng
dc.titleIntegrated management of the invasive weed, cut-leaved teasel (Dipsacus laciniatus L.) along a Missouri highwayseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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