Effect of colostral administration practices on serum immunoglobulin concentration in dairy calves

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Effect of colostral administration practices on serum immunoglobulin concentration in dairy calves

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dc.contributor.advisor Tyler, Jeff W. en
dc.contributor.author Chigerwe, Munashe, 1977- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-02-23T16:34:53Z
dc.date.available 2010-02-23T16:34:53Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2008 Spring en
dc.identifier.other ChigerweM-042808-D10482 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/5602
dc.description The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Vita. en_US
dc.description "May 2008" en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2008. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Veterinary pathobiology area program. en_US
dc.description.abstract Despite the accumulated understanding of the factors which affect passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins and its recognized importance in dairy calves, approximately 35-40 % of US dairy calves have inadequate passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins. The objectives of this research were 1) determine the frequency and role of precolostral serum immunoglobulin concentration in dairy calves, 2) Compare various methods in assessing colostral immunoglobulin concentration, 3) determine the amount of colostral IgG required for adequate passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins in calves fed colostrum by oroesophageal tubing and evaluate other accepted factors on passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins in dairy bull calves, and 4) determine factors affecting serum IgG concentrations in bottle fed heifer calves. There was no apparent link between precolostral serum immunoglobulin against common infectious agents known to be transmitted transplacentally. The weight of first milking colostrum as a test method has low sensitivity, thus its use in identifying colostrum with low IgG concentration is not justified. At least 150 to 200 g of colostral IgG is required for adequate passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins in tube fed calves. Probability of FPT in calves ingesting 3 L at first feeding and 3 L at 12 hours was < 0.05 even at low colostral IgG concentrations bottle fed calves. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2008 Freely available dissertations (MU) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Colostrum en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Calves -- Feeding and feeds en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Calves -- Immunology en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Immunoglobulin G en_US
dc.title Effect of colostral administration practices on serum immunoglobulin concentration in dairy calves en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Veterinary pathobiology area program en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name Ph. D. en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en_US
dc.identifier.merlin .b66787294 en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 318651393 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2008 Dissertations


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