The late choral works of Igor Stravinsky: a reception history

MOspace/Manakin Repository

Breadcrumbs Navigation

The late choral works of Igor Stravinsky: a reception history

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/5625

[+] show full item record


Title: The late choral works of Igor Stravinsky: a reception history
Author: Elder, Rusty Dale
Date: 2008
Publisher: University of Missouri--Columbia
Abstract: Despite his preeminence in twentieth-century music, the late works of Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) remain in relative obscurity: seldom performed, inadequately recorded, poorly understood, and frequently disparaged. The troubled reception of these works stands in remarkable contradiction to the composer's ever-increasing renown; few contemporary composers can rival Stravinsky in terms of popular acclaim, concert performances, recordings, or continuing influence. Stravinsky's late pieces were the subject of enormous controversy in the 1950s and 1960s. Written using the fractious twelve-tone method of Arnold Schoenberg (1874-1951), these scores represent perhaps the most astonishing change of style ever undertaken by a composer of comparable stature. This thesis will survey the reception of Stravinsky's major late vocal works in England and America, including In memoriam Dylan Thomas (1954), Canticum sacrum (1956), Threni (1958), A Sermon, a Narrative, and a Prayer (1961), The Flood (1962), Introitus (1965), and Requiem Canticles (1966). The reception of each piece will be traced chronologically, beginning with responses to première performances and progressing to contemporary scholarship.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/5625
Other Identifiers: ElderR-121508-T15789

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[+] show full item record