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dc.contributor.advisorPetrocik, John R., 1944-eng
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Jordaneng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.coverage.temporal1900-1999eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 11, 2009)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Political science.eng
dc.description.abstractThis thesis tracks the relationship between voter positions on ideological issues and voter partisanship in presidential elections from 1976 to 2004 using data from the ANES. Based on Stimson's (1975) work, the electorate was divided into quartiles, representing a continuum of political engagement. On one end are those voters that are not paying attention to politics, that do not organize their beliefs along the abstract liberal-conservative dimension, and that are not highly educated. On the other end are those voters that are paying attention to politics, that organize their beliefs along the liberal-conservative dimension, and that are highly educated. I present evidence demonstrating the most politically engaged twenty-five percent of the population are consistently connecting their partisanship and issue positions at higher rates from 1976 to 2004, representing a trend that does not seem to be stalled by any single election. The least politically engaged twenty-five percent of the electorate are not making any absolute or election specific strides in connecting their partisanship and issue positions. The middle fifty percent of the electorate have fluctuated in connecting their issues positions and their partisanship depending on the election. Only the top twenty-five percent of the electorate have made large strides in organizing their political beliefs since 1976, leaving the rest of the electorate lagging far behind.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb70622516eng
dc.identifier.oclc430065065eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5669
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5669eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2008 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2008 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshVoting researcheng
dc.subject.lcshHuman behavioreng
dc.subject.lcshElectionseng
dc.subject.lcshPresidents -- Electionseng
dc.subject.lcshPresidential candidateseng
dc.titleThe ideological gap: behavioral trends of the politically active, 1976-2004eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical science (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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