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dc.contributor.advisorPhillips, Ronald G.eng
dc.contributor.authorFelts, Anneeng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 22, 2009).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Ronald G. Phillips.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Architectural studies.eng
dc.description.abstractWith recent changes in the economy and a dwindling supply of natural resources, energy conservation is a very relevant and important concern among homeowners. Each homeowner has a unique perception of environmental issues, including energy conservation, and yet all are similarly influenced. These different perceptions are based, in part, on differences in preferred worldviews. It is argued here that more effective educational delivery methods could be employed if they were based on these individual worldview preferences. This study investigates both psychological and environmental worldviews in light of energy conservation education. Using psychological worldview theory and environmental worldview theory, this research contributes to better understanding of individuals who are interested in home energy conservation. The research provides knowledge that will improve education delivery to help motivate individuals to conserve energy in the home. An online survey was distributed to a University Extension listserv composed of individuals who were interested in receiving more information about home energy conservation. The survey consisted of a psychological paradigmatic theory inventory and the revised New Environmental Paradigm scale. This research supports the assumption that there are many different ways of understanding environmental issues; no way is more correct than any other, but some are more preferred than others. It suggests that by targeting each individual's worldview and the way she/he comes to know and approaches environmental issues, researchers and educators can begin to contribute in a more individually meaningful manner rather than continuing to treat people as an aggregate homogenous whole.eng
dc.identifier.merlin.b71029047
dc.identifier.oclc437427492
dc.identifier.otherFeltsA-120208-T11541
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/5746
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2008 Freely available theses (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2008 Theses
dc.subject.lcshEnergy conservationeng
dc.subject.lcshArchitecture and energy conservationeng
dc.subject.lcshEnvironmental psychologyeng
dc.titleHome energy conservation: psychological and environmental worldviewseng
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectural studies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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