Causes of the noun bias in early vocabulary development

MOspace/Manakin Repository

Breadcrumbs Navigation

Causes of the noun bias in early vocabulary development

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/5749

[-] show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Goodman, Judith C. (Judith Claire), 1958- en
dc.contributor.author Moore, Chesney C. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-02-23T17:15:26Z
dc.date.available 2010-02-23T17:15:26Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2008 Spring en
dc.identifier.other MooreC-032009-T9835 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/5749
dc.description "May 2008" en_US
dc.description Thesis (M.H.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2008. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- communication science & disorders. en_US
dc.description.abstract Children typically learn many more nouns than verbs early in vocabulary development. The cause of this "noun-bias" is unclear. One possibility is that caregivers use more nouns and prompt for nouns more often. That is, the noun-bias may be the result of input frequency. To evaluate the role of frequency, 26 English-speaking toddlers from 12- to 30-months of age were presented novel nouns and verbs with equal frequencies. Six unfamiliar objects were paired with novel words used in noun syntax. Six actions, one with each object, were paired with novel words used in verb syntax. Each object and action with their corresponding words was presented six times in each of ten bimonthly sessions. Vocabulary acquisition was examined with production and comprehension tasks. When input frequency of novel words was controlled in this longitudinal study, children did not produce a noun-bias in baseline, imitation, spontaneous production, or prompted production. Likewise, there was not evidence of a noun-bias in comprehension. Instead, children produced the verbs more often in all production contexts. The noun and verb comprehension tasks were not directly comparable, but children did not appear to comprehend words from one syntactic category earlier than the other. Thus, contrary to prior studies of word learning in English-speaking children, we did not find a noun-bias when input word frequency was controlled. Alternative explanations for the noun-bias are considered. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2008 Freely available theses (MU) en_US
dc.subject.mesh Semantics en_US
dc.subject.mesh Vocabulary en_US
dc.subject.mesh Language Development en_US
dc.subject.mesh Verbal Behavior en_US
dc.subject.mesh Child en_US
dc.subject.mesh Child Language en_US
dc.title Causes of the noun bias in early vocabulary development en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Communication science & disorders en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name M.H.S. en_US
thesis.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.identifier.merlin .b7051026x en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 423587776 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2008 Theses


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] show simple item record