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dc.contributor.advisorLangdon, Susan Helen, 1952-eng
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, John Tristaneng
dc.coverage.spatialIsrael -- Kabri Siteeng
dc.coverage.spatialAlalakh (Extinct city)eng
dc.coverage.spatialEgypt -- Ḍabʻah, Tall al-eng
dc.coverage.spatialEgypteng
dc.coverage.spatialIsraeleng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 22, 2008)eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2008.eng
dc.description.abstractDuring the Middle and Late Bronze Age, the "civilized world" was not centered on the Aegean or the Mediterranean as in later centuries, but was instead shifted east. The older, established civilizations in Egypt and the Near East were the focus of commerce and diplomacy throughout the period, and the Aegean was located at the extreme western edge of their world views. In this sphere, three palaces at Avaris in Egypt, Tel Kabri in modern Israel and Alalakh in ancient Syria display Aegean frescoes and motifs. The question, therefore, becomes why? By examining the fresco fragments themselves I establish that the motifs represented and the style of manufacture are in fact Aegean. Textual evidence from the Near East and Egyptian tomb paintings suggest that the Aegean was well-known for its artistic accomplishments and that Aegean goods and the artisans that produced them were treated as elite commodities. This evidence ties the artisans into a context of royal gift exchange. Since frescoes themselves cannot be transported from one king to another, I believe that the artisans must therefore have traveled from the Aegean to the eastern palaces to adorn the walls of the foreign kings.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb64586315eng
dc.identifier.oclc244441927eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5762eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5762
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.sourceSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshMural painting and decorationeng
dc.subject.lcshKabri Site (Israel) -- Antiquitieseng
dc.subject.lcshAlalakh (Extinct city) -- Antiquitieseng
dc.subject.lcshḌabʻah, Tall al- (Egypt) -- Antiquitieseng
dc.titlePainting the wine-dark sea : traveling Aegean fresco artists in the Middle and late Bronze Age Eastern Mediterraneaneng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineArt history and archaeology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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