Analysis of twenty-five years of heavy rainfall events in the Texas Hill Country

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Analysis of twenty-five years of heavy rainfall events in the Texas Hill Country

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/5792

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dc.contributor.advisor Market, Patrick S. en
dc.contributor.author Schnetzler, Amy Elisa en_US
dc.coverage.spatial Texas -- Hill County
dc.date.accessioned 2010-02-23T17:16:15Z
dc.date.available 2010-02-23T17:16:15Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2008 Summer en
dc.identifier.other SchnetzlerA-081808-T11885 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/5792
dc.description The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Title from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 14, 2009) en_US
dc.description Vita. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Thesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2008. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Soil, environmental and atmospheric sciences. en_US
dc.description.abstract Forecasting heavy rain events and the area of greatest threat has been a long standing challenge in operational meteorology. This is especially true in certain regions where the physical geography lends itself to the creation of such events. With its thin soil layers, low latitude, and proximity to the Gulf of Mexico, the Texas Hill County is one such region. Twenty-five years of daily (24-hour) rainfall data were examined for the Texas Hill Country using observations from 86 cooperative climate stations in the region; the period examined for this study was 1982-2006. Days with measurable precipitation were treated as a gamma distribution in order to determine the top 2%, 1%, and 0.5% to define events as unusual, rare, and extreme, respectively. Quantifying rainfall as a distribution provides forecasters with supplementary information on precipitation thresholds that can lead to significant flash flooding or major flooding. This approach was applied to each station as well as to the aggregate data for all 86 stations, resulting in an analysis of 130,986 observations of 24-hour precipitation. Soundings were then constructed for each using the 3-hourly North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) gridded datasets. From these individual soundings mean values were created, and composite soundings were then made for each rainfall threshold for the Mesohigh, Frontal and Synoptic classifications. Convective stability parameters were also tested for each of the classes of heavy rain events. From these exercises, it was learned that high values of precipitable water and wind shear are key ingredients for heavy rainfall to occur. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Rain and rainfall -- Forecasting en_US
dc.title Analysis of twenty-five years of heavy rainfall events in the Texas Hill Country en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Soil, environmental and atmospheric sciences en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name M.S. en_US
thesis.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.identifier.merlin .b70639115 en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 430531125 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2008 Theses
dc.relation.ispartofcollection 2008 Freely available theses (MU)


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