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dc.contributor.advisorDeng, Baolineng
dc.contributor.authorKoirala, Amod K., 1974-eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on September 14, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Civil engineering..eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The Excitation Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS) has the potential to be used for the real time monitoring of environmental effects on water and aquatic systems.Chemical compound samples prepared in the laboratory whereas water and wastewater samples were collected form around the state of Missouri and Kansas. Samples were filtered and properly diluted before they were scanned for EEMS. 3-D signatures of water and wastewater samples from known source were obtained from f-4500 fluorescence spectrophotometer to characterize the fluorescence pattern, center position and peak intensities. It was found that the DI water samples showed scattered but weak fluorescence whereas the tap water samples showed a fluorescence center clustered at excitation 220nm and emission 350nm. The sample has very low fluorescence peak intensity. Spectra from all sources i.e. chemical compound sample, river water, lake water, landfill leachate, wastewater influent and effluents showed distinct pattern and peak centers on them. However, signature on landfill leachate and wastewater influents did show higher peak intensities. The dilution factor did not change the pattern of signature and the location of fluorescence instead changed the peak intensity. Dilution was must to landfill leachate samples and wastewater samples to get clear and actual signature. Higher and intense peaks were found with the increasing concentration of sample.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb59489133eng
dc.identifier.oclc171288777eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5875
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5875eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshX-ray spectroscopyeng
dc.subject.lcshWater -- Distribution -- Environmental aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshEnvironmental engineeringeng
dc.titleUse of fluorescence excitation emission matrix spectroscopy for water and wastewater characterizationeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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