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dc.contributor.advisorSchoelz, James E. (James Edgar), 1958-eng
dc.contributor.authorCawly, John D., 1949-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (March 1, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Plant pathology.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The hypersensitive response (HR) is an indicator of genetic resistance when screening for disease resistance to viral pathogens. Genetic resistance has been described as having two characteristics: rapid cell death at the site of inoculation and localization of the pathogen to that site. I examined a resistant Nicotiana hybrid, which does not respond with HR-mediated cell death, yet maintains resistance to Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) strain W260. Another host gene, CCD1, blocks both HR-mediated and systemic cell death induced specifically by P6 of CaMV strain W260. Interfering double stranded RNA (RNAi) technology has proven to be a very effective way to silence a single gene in plants. With the design and construction of gene silencing hairpins homologous with known conserved sequences of identified R genes, it is possible to silence large families of R genes. Examination of the HR in these silenced plants can identify putative resistance genes. With these silencing hairpins, I showed that the endogenous N gene can be silenced with both constructs. Additionally, resistance to another virus, Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), breaks down in the silenced plants. This is evidence that not only the N gene can be silenced, but also that resistance genes that differ from the N gene by as much as 10% can also be silenced when homologous sequences are used.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb57908692eng
dc.identifier.oclc85485035eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5880
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5880eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshNatural immunityeng
dc.subject.lcshPlants -- Disease and pest resistanceeng
dc.subject.lcshNicotianaeng
dc.subject.lcshCell deatheng
dc.titleExamination of host genetic determinants of the hypersensitive response in Nicotiana edwardsonii to CaMV and TMVeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant pathology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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