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dc.contributor.advisorSchoelz, James E. (James Edgar), 1958-eng
dc.contributor.authorCawly, John D., 1949-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (March 1, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] The hypersensitive response (HR) is an indicator of genetic resistance when screening for disease resistance to viral pathogens. Genetic resistance has been described as having two characteristics: rapid cell death at the site of inoculation and localization of the pathogen to that site. I examined a resistant Nicotiana hybrid, which does not respond with HR-mediated cell death, yet maintains resistance to Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) strain W260. Another host gene, CCD1, blocks both HR-mediated and systemic cell death induced specifically by P6 of CaMV strain W260. Interfering double stranded RNA (RNAi) technology has proven to be a very effective way to silence a single gene in plants. With the design and construction of gene silencing hairpins homologous with known conserved sequences of identified R genes, it is possible to silence large families of R genes. Examination of the HR in these silenced plants can identify putative resistance genes. With these silencing hairpins, I showed that the endogenous N gene can be silenced with both constructs. Additionally, resistance to another virus, Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), breaks down in the silenced plants. This is evidence that not only the N gene can be silenced, but also that resistance genes that differ from the N gene by as much as 10% can also be silenced when homologous sequences are used.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb57908692eng
dc.identifier.oclc85485035eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5880eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5880
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshNatural immunityeng
dc.subject.lcshPlants -- Disease and pest resistanceeng
dc.subject.lcshNicotianaeng
dc.subject.lcshCell deatheng
dc.titleExamination of host genetic determinants of the hypersensitive response in Nicotiana edwardsonii to CaMV and TMVeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant pathology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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