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dc.contributor.advisorMuzika, Rose-Marie, 1958-eng
dc.contributor.authorYates, Mark D., 1966-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 14, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] Populations of forest dwelling bats have been in decline in recent years, and have therefore become increasing foci in forestry research efforts. Difficulty in bat species detection complicates bat - habitat studies. Findings from this study reveal that acoustic methods provided greater detectability of species presence at a site than mist netting. Species presence was detected using two acoustic detections, and while individuals were equally detectable, detector placement influenced detectability. Incorporating differences in detectability, a priori habitat models from three spatial scales were compared to determine occupancy of five bat species. No habitat models adequately described the occupancy of gray bats. Red bat occupancy was inversely related to basal area (BA), directly related to canopy closure and varied among ecological subsections within the study area. Eastern pipistrelle bat occupancy was inversely related to BA and directly related to canopy closure. Northern long-eared bat occupancy was directly related to amount of hard edge in the landscape and was greater in shortleaf pine forests and woodlands. Indiana bat occupancy was directly related to BA of large diameter snags, directly related to the amount of hard edge and proportion of non-forested land cover in the landscape.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb59296719eng
dc.identifier.oclc164359049eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5883eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5883
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshBats -- Detectioneng
dc.subject.lcshBats -- Habitateng
dc.subject.lcshBats -- Effect of habitat modification oneng
dc.subject.lcshForest reserveseng
dc.subject.lcshEastern pipistrelleeng
dc.subject.lcshGray bateng
dc.subject.lcshEastern red bateng
dc.subject.lcshNorthern long-eared myotiseng
dc.subject.lcshMyotis sodaliseng
dc.titleDetection and modeling of bat species occupancy at multiple scales across a forested landscape in southeastern Missourieng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineForestry (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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