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dc.contributor.advisorEmerich, David W. (David William)eng
dc.contributor.authorOehrle, Nathan Wayne, 1972-eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (March 5, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] The agronomically vital, nitrogen-fixing symbioses between soybean and the soil bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a model system for the study of plant-microbe interactions. Its complexity extends from pre-infection and continues throughout the process. Emerging roots are the sites of infection and it was discovered that B. japonicum must compete for colonization with other inhabitants of the soil and those from the germinating seed. Through elimination of these parameters, attachment kinetics is found to occur in several phases, some lasting for only seconds, with minimal contact time resulting in maximal infection. After contact, the bacteria invade the root and form nodules on the root surface. As the nodule ages, the bacteria within these pockets begin the energy intensive process of providing nitrogen to the plant in exchange for a carbon and energy source. The effects of the environmental toxin trifluoroacetic acid (a breakdown product of the newest refrigerants: HCFCs) on this process demonstrate how important the health of the host plant is. B. japonicum is very resistant to the effects of the highly water soluble environmental toxin, however the soybean plant was not. The energy requirements of this process demand a healthy system and that nutrient transfer between the partners to be rapid and efficient. The possibility of carbon recycling during nitrogen fixation was also examined, demonstrating further the important role of alanine, pyruvate and possibly ethanol during peak nitrogen fixation. Most importantly, the knowledge gained from this study supports the theory of bacteroid alanine excretion during the soybean-Bradyrhizobium japonicum symbiosis.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb57916342eng
dc.identifier.oclc85763088eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5884eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5884
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.sourceSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshRhizobiaceaeeng
dc.subject.lcshSoybeaneng
dc.titlePhysiologic and metabolic interactions in the soybean/bradyrhizobium japonicum symbiosiseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiochemistry (Agriculture) (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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