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dc.contributor.advisorZaghouani, Habibeng
dc.contributor.authorBell, James Jeremiah, 1977-eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed December 22, 2006).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.description"May 2006"eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] T cells are one of the key components of the acquired immune response. These cells are instrumental in fighting bacterial and viral infections. Unfortunately, T cells can also be responsible for aggressively attacking our own body, which can lead to autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. In the dissertation presented here, both the good and the bad of T cell responses have been studied. T cell memory provides the fundamental basis for the function of vaccines. Upon encounter with a microbe or foreign substance, certain T cells are able to remain alive for very long periods of time and then confer an accelerated protection upon a second encounter with the same foreign element. In the first section of the dissertation, it is shown that cell division at the initial encounter is a controlling factor for the generation of functional memory T cells. In the second section, a therapeutic approach for the treatment of multiple sclerosis was examined. The lab has recently identified a novel therapy that uses antibodies to suppress disease in an animal model of human multiple sclerosis and here it was tested in a setting more relevant to the genetic complexity of humans. It is shown that the genetic background may have pronounced effects in not only susceptibility to disease, but also determining the effectiveness of treatment.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb57475192eng
dc.identifier.oclc77524172eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5885eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5885
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshT cells -- Immunologyeng
dc.subject.lcshMultiple sclerosis -- Immunotherapyeng
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocytes -- immunologyeng
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocytes -- physiologyeng
dc.subject.meshImmunotherapyeng
dc.subject.meshMultiple Sclerosis -- therapyeng
dc.titleT cells from immunological memory to autoimmune diseaseeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology (Medicine) (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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