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dc.contributor.advisorJonassen, David H., 1947-2012eng
dc.contributor.authorLee, Chwee Beng, 1972-eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (May 2, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] Many studies have shown that using cognitive conflict strategy, which is a common approach to foster conceptual change, is insufficient to induce change (Alervemann & Hague, 1989; Hynd & Alvermann, 1989). Some researchers have advocated problem solving to induce learners in conceptual change process (Jonassen, Howland, Moore, & Marra, 2003; Lesh and Lamon, 1992) as it is central to problem representation (Jonassen, 2003). One way to help learners develop their problem representations is through encouraging learners to build dynamic models of the real world systems. This study argues that the relationship between conceptual change and problem solving is dynamic as they constantly interact with each other. Analyses of this study reveal that students who constructed problem representation did significantly perform better in the post Knowledge Test, and problem solving is to a certain extent determined by the formation of conceptual models. Also, the types of strategies students used to build a coherent understanding which is the central phenomenon are influenced by domain knowledge, structural knowledge, and epistemological beliefs. Students who are more likely to adopt the self questioning strategy not only able to construct better problem representations, but they also undergo significant conceptual changes.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb58487888eng
dc.identifier.oclc123915626eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5886eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5886
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshProblem solvingeng
dc.subject.lcshConflict managementeng
dc.subject.lcshCognitive learning theoryeng
dc.titleCapturing and assessing conceptual change in problem solvingeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineInformation science and learning technologies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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