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dc.contributor.advisorBettencourt, Anneng
dc.contributor.authorMolix, Lisa Anneng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on March 24, 2009)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Contact settings that include equal status, cooperation/pursuit of common goals, acquaintance potential, and authority sanction can improve intergroup attitudes. However, research investigating whether these attitudes generalize beyond the initial contact setting has yielded equivocal results. The present experiment examined the relationship between optimal intergroup contact with members of invisible and visible stigmatized groups, post-contact social support, and immediate as well as generalized intergroup attitudes. In line with predictions, the results revealed that participants in the contact with a member of a visible stigmatized group condition (i.e., Black-target) reported more positive intergroup attitudes than their contact with a member of an invisible stigmatized group counterparts (i.e., Schizophrenic-target). However, the results of the present study did not support the hypothesis that positive past experiences with members of a stigmatized group would be associated with more positive intergroup attitudes immediately after an optimal intergroup interaction. In addition, the results failed to reveal that the post-contact social support induction led to more positive generalized outgroup attitudes, feelings, or perceptions. Finally, the results failed to reveal that the ratings taken immediately after the contact setting, mediated the relationship between contact with a stigmatized target and generalized outgroup attitudes, feelings, or perceptions.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb6667265xeng
dc.identifier.oclc316871115eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5947
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5947eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshIntergroup relationseng
dc.titleThe generalization of positive intergroup attitudes: reducing intergroup anxietyeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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