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dc.contributor.advisorSlane, Kathleen W., 1949-eng
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Christopher Glenn, 1967-eng
dc.coverage.spatialEgypteng
dc.coverage.temporal332 B.C.-640 A.Deng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on March 7, 2008)eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] The Roman province of Aegyptus has most often been considered from an administrative, governmental, or economic perspective while its art and architecture has usually been examined through a focus on individual elements, usually from a strictly Egyptological or Classical viewpoint. This dissertation fills a gap in the literature on Roman Egypt by creating a comprehensive survey of not only romanized artistic elements that enter but the continuation of indigenous imagery in the first centuries of Roman rule. Instead of seeing Egypt in an overly simplistic way as it was either like or unlike the Ptolemaic period or like or unlike the other eastern imperial provinces as in previous research, the material has been put forth to allow a more nuanced view. As has been done for other provinces, the surviving art and architecture from the period has been compiled and with the addition of literary and papyrological evidence to fill the gaps in the archaeological record, the province can now be viewed as a whole. The material finds and influences can be broken down into two main parts. The first was the influence and policies of the Roman state on the art and architecture that included coinage, imperial and pharaonic sculpture and reliefs, urbanization, city architecture, differences approaches toward cities and villages, and temple structures. This part of the examination pointed to an overall separation between artistic Graeco-Roman and Egyptian styles and forms. The second focus was the individual's response to the new environment as seen in religious forms (terra-cotta and bronze figurines) and funerary works (treatment of the body, tomb decoration, stelae imagery, and death assemblages). In these elements there is a greater amount of style and form mixing as well as the opportunity for individual choice. The art and architecture of Egypt exhibits both changes and continuities in the Roman period that connect it in many ways with other eastern provinces.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb62605148eng
dc.identifier.oclc213098887eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5948
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5948eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.sourceSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshEgypt -- Antiquities, Romaneng
dc.subject.lcshEgypt -- Historyeng
dc.titleRoman Egypt : change amid continuity in the art and architecture of an Eastern Imperial Provinceeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineArt history and archaeology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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