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dc.contributor.advisorBudd, John, 1953-eng
dc.contributor.advisorAdkins, Deniceeng
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Katherine E., 1972-eng
dc.date.issued2016eng
dc.date.submitted2016 Falleng
dc.descriptionAbstract from public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation supervisors: Drs. John Budd and Denice Adkins.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes vita.eng
dc.description.abstractThe nursing profession is evolving from basing patient care on tradition and expert opinion to emphasizing evidence based practice. Literature suggests that nurses do not have the information literacy skills required for evidence based practice, and that they have neither adequate instruction nor the experience needed to effectively, efficiently, and ethically find the information that they need. To help meet this need, this dissertation examines the effects of a pre-requisite information literacy credit course on the information seeking behavior of community college students in an introductory nursing course. I used a convergent parallel designed mixed-methods research approach, employing both a knowledge based assessment (n = 153) and a series of interviews/focus groups (n= 16) to test the hypothesis and sub-hypotheses. Students' exposure to the library (using library databases, receiving assistance from a reference librarian, or attending a "one-shot" library instruction session) was also measured. Using the Chi-square test for association, a statistically significant relationship was found between the correct answers on the knowledge based assessment and the completion of the course: X2 (3, N = 153) = 19.03, p < .00; suggesting that students who completed LIB 101 performed significantly better on the knowledge based assessment than the students who did not complete LIB 101. A low, significant, and positive relationship was found between the completion of the course and the information literacy score, rpb = .26, p < .01 using Point-Biserial correlation. Regression Analysis provided evidence that the library course was a significant predictor of the information literacy score, t(150) = 2.12, p < .05. Eleven themes supporting the quantitative study emerged from the interviews/focus groups. Although the research supported the main hypothesis, there is much room for further study--not only within the confines of the effect of such a course on nursing students, but also the effect of information literacy instruction on both student and practicing nurses. The future of nursing relies upon evidence based practice, and, ultimately, evidence based practice relies on information literate nurses.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references (pages 125-139).eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (ix, 173 pages) : illustrationseng
dc.identifier.merlinb118917122eng
dc.identifier.oclc992982062eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/59780
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/59780eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccesseng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subject.FASTCommunity college studentseng
dc.subject.FASTNursing students -- Educationeng
dc.subject.FASTInformation literacy -- Study and teaching (Higher)eng
dc.subject.FASTEvidence-based nursingeng
dc.titleThe effects of pre-requisite library research instruction on the information seeking knowledge and behavior of community college students in an introductory nursing courseeng
dc.title.alternativeEffects of prerequisite library research instruction on the information seeking knowledge and behavior of community college students in an introductory nursing courseeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineInformation science and learning technologies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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