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dc.contributor.advisorShaffer, Victoria, 1978-eng
dc.contributor.authorHathaway, Andrew (Andrew M.)eng
dc.date.issued2016eng
dc.date.submitted2016 Falleng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] The current study examines framing effects using two different problems (disease outbreak and investment), while attempting to replicate earlier findings and shed light on unanswered questions within the literature. The study also examines the effect of framing on self-reported health status as a real-life consequence of this phenomenon. A subset of respondents (N = 1,687) from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) completed two framing problems. Relationships between framing effects and the other assessments were examined. Nearly half of the sample (48.2%) showed a framing effect in at least one problem. However, only 11.1% displayed a framing effect in both problems. Women were more likely to show framing effects in the disease outbreak problem (p=.008), but men were more likely to exhibit framing effects in the investment problem (p=.066). Age was negatively related to framing effects in the investment problem (p=.002) but tended to be positively related to framing effects in the disease outbreak problem (p=.068). Respondents with less education tended to be more likely to exhibit framing effects in both domains (p=.003). A one-way ANOVA revealed that there was no difference in self-report health status for those showing different framing effects (p=.504). The results suggest that framing effects exist, yet predictors of framing effects are not universal across all domains. However, self-report health status was identical across individuals showing different framing effects, and there may not be any real-world consequences of exhibiting the effect.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references (pages 29-34).eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (iv, 44 pages) : illustrationseng
dc.identifier.merlinb118610090eng
dc.identifier.oclc986230042eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/59870
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/59870eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.FASTDecision makingeng
dc.subject.FASTEpidemicseng
dc.subject.FASTInvestmentseng
dc.subject.FASTHealth and Retirement Studyeng
dc.titleFraming effects : a fresh perspective from the health and retirement studyeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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