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dc.contributor.advisorGalliher, John F.eng
dc.contributor.advisorPearce, Tola Olueng
dc.contributor.authorSkiffer, La Tanyaeng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on March 24, 2009)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] Although there have been some research studies focused on offenders' perceptions of crime, the majority have involved male inmates and used quantitative methods. Few studies have focused on women's perceptions of the origins of crime, while no study has focused on Black women offender's perceptions of what causes crime. This research project seeks to fill part of this gap in the literature. This research expands on two earlier studies. First, Mathis and Rayman (1972) studied male prison inmates' views and perceptions on what causes crime and found that inmates identify external, environmental factors as one of the primary causes of crime. Second, Gillespie and Galliher (1972) highlight the importance of male inmates' definition of the impact of prison on their prospects for the future. The current dissertation explores Black female inmates' perceptions of what causes crime as well as their orientation toward the future. Thirty (30) Black female offenders in a large West Coast prison were interviewed using a semi-structured, in-depth interview questionnaire. The women were between the ages of 19 and 75, and primarily of lower education and socio-economic status. Findings indicate that Black female inmates' primarily cite two types of causal attributions: external and internal/external. Overwhelmingly, Black female inmates cite more external factors as causes of crime (e.g., abuse or other people). Furthermore, drug use was also frequently cited by informants. For many informants, drug use originated in external causes but became a personal or internal cause of subsequent behaviors. These findings challenge the view that prisoners primarily identify external factors in regard to causes of crime.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb66673574eng
dc.identifier.oclc316881782eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6025eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6025
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshAfrican American prisoners -- Case studieseng
dc.subject.lcshWomen prisonerseng
dc.subject.lcshFemale offenderseng
dc.titleViews and perceptions of what causes crime : the case of black women offenderseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineSociology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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