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dc.contributor.advisorBarrow, Lloyd H.eng
dc.contributor.authorConcannon, James Peter, 1977-eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 3, 2009)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Curriculum and instruction.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] This is a cross-sectional study of 519 undergraduate engineering majors' self-efficacy beliefs at a large, research extensive, Midwestern university. Engineering self-efficacy is an individual's belief in his or her ability to successfully negotiate the academic hurdles of the engineering program. Engineering self-efficacy was obtained from four variables: self-efficacy 1, self-efficacy 2, engineering career outcome expectations, and coping self-efficacy. The four variables were analyzed using a repeated analysis of variance among levels of gender, ethnicity, years students had been enrolled in their engineering program, engineering specialty, transfer status, and freshmen interest group participation. No significant differences in mean engineering self-efficacy scores were found by gender, ethnicity, specialty, transfer status, or freshmen interest group participation. Significant differences in engineering self-efficacy were found among years students had been enrolled in the program. Significant interactions were also found due to the following: a) women had significantly lower mean coping self-efficacy scores than men; b) African Americans had significantly lower mean career outcome expectations scores; c) chemical engineering majors had significantly higher self-efficacy 2 scores than all other engineering specialties; and d) transfer students had significantly lower self-efficacy 1 scores than non-transfer students.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb70600016eng
dc.identifier.oclc428976682eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6050
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6050eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshEngineering studentseng
dc.subject.lcshSelf-efficacyeng
dc.titleA cross-sectional study of engineering majors' self-efficacyeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCurriculum and instruction (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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