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dc.contributor.advisorWalker, John C.eng
dc.contributor.authorLarue, Clayton T., 1977-eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on June 19, 2009)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biological sciences.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The development of a complex organism, such as a plant, requires the function of multiple pathways that regulate various aspects of the developmental process. Here pathways that regulate various aspects of plant development are investigated. A regulatory module consisting of a NAC-domain transcription factor, CUC2, in which targeting by the miRNA family, miRNA164, is disrupted, was investigated. This disruption resulted in an overaccumulation of the CUC2 transcript. This disruption uncovers roles for this regulatory module in controlling lateral organ enlargement and patterning. This regulatory module is proposed to act as a global regulator of lateral organ patterning and enlargement as well as meristem maintenance. A novel function for a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) cascade in floral organ abscission is uncovered. Many plants use abscission as a means to shed unwanted organs or to release fruit and seeds at maturity. This process requires tight coordination through regulatory pathways, including the MKK4/MKK5 MAPK cascade. The DEVIL (DVL) family encodes predicted small proteins that all carry a conserved C-terminal motif. While it remains unclear if these small proteins play a role in signaling pathways, several other small protein families in plants have been shown to play such a role. Here investigations into the active gene product and possible genetic interactors are discussed.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb69061890eng
dc.identifier.oclc403775551eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6051
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6051eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshArabidopsis -- Developmenteng
dc.subject.lcshAbscission (Botany)eng
dc.subject.lcshMitogen-activated protein kinaseseng
dc.titleRegulation of plant development in Arabidopsiseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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