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dc.contributor.advisorBardone-Cone, Annaeng
dc.contributor.authorCass, Kamila M.eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 4, 2009)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2008.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] Two studies examined the effects of exposure to conventional and novel thin-ideal media and the efficacy of a media literacy intervention to reduce immediate negative effects of exposure. Moderators were also examined, along with the efficacy of the media literacy intervention to reduce risk-factors for eating disorders at a two-week follow-up. In Study 1, 263 female undergraduates completed questionnaires, viewed a media literacy intervention or a control video, viewed 20 images of thin female models from pro-anorexia websites or fashion magazines, or a control condition, answered a final set of questionnaires, and completed a survey two-weeks later. Study 2 included 212 female undergraduates and differed from Study 1 in that participants viewed a pro-anorexia website or a control website, and no follow-up was conducted. Collectively, participants exposed to thin-ideal media experienced a range of deleterious effects on mood, body image, cognitions, and behavioral expectations. There was limited support for the efficacy of the media literacy intervention on immediate outcomes, although in Study 2, the intervention positively impacted some aspects of body image. There was no support for the intervention to reduce risk-factors for eating disorders at the follow-up. Moderators played an important role in Study 2, though not so much in Study 1. Findings are discussed in light of the need to develop effective interventions and to continue to explore the impact of novel forms of thin-ideal media.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb70603467eng
dc.identifier.oclc429047688eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6093
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6093eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshMedia literacyeng
dc.subject.lcshEating disorders -- Adjuvant treatmenteng
dc.subject.lcshEating disorders -- Psychological aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshEating disorders in womeneng
dc.titleThe impact of a media literacy intervention on the effects of exposure to conventional and novel thin-ideal media : immediate effects and two-week follow-upeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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