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dc.contributor.authorHollander- Rodriguez, Joyce C.eng
dc.contributor.authorMontjoy, Holly L.eng
dc.contributor.authorSmedra, Brynneng
dc.contributor.authorProuty, J. P.eng
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Andreweng
dc.contributor.authorGuthmann, Richardeng
dc.date.issued2017eng
dc.description.abstractQ: Do oral decongestants have a clinically significant effect on BP in patients with hypertension? Evidence-based answer: It is unclear. Pseudoephedrine causes an average increase of 1.2 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure (BP) in patients with controlled hypertension. However, the studies are not adequately powered to provide evidence about whether this rise in systolic BP is linked to patient-oriented outcomes (strength of recommendation [SOR]: C, multiple randomized controlled trials [RCTs] supporting disease-oriented evidence). Significant variations in BP are defined differently among studies (TABLE1-7). In addition, we do not have data on chronic use of oral decongestants; the longest time on medication in these trials was 4 weeks.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/60990eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2017 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 66, no. 06 (2017): E1-E2eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjecthypertension, decongestants, pseudoephedrineeng
dc.titleDo oral decongestants have a clinically significant effect on BP in patients with hypertension?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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