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dc.contributor.advisorAnderson, Kim M.eng
dc.contributor.authorBang, Eun-Juneng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb. 11, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Kim Anderson.eng
dc.descriptionPh.D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009eng
dc.description.abstractThousands of international students come to the United States every year and from the moment they arrive they experience stress from multiple directions. This study focuses on gender differences in stress levels for international students and different types of social support as moderators of that stress. Survey data from a midwestern university is reviewed regarding general adjustment issues experienced by international students (N = 169). Descriptive statistical and multiple regression analyses are used to test hypotheses. Additionally, gender role theory and a transactional model of stress serve as a framework to approach and understand the issues. The findings reveal that gender, academic concerns, language concerns, and length of stay in the United States are all significant predictors of stress. Furthermore, academic stress is significantly associated with gender and social support. The reassurance of worth, guidance, and social integration subscales of the Social Provision Scale (SPS) as well as the overall sum of the SPS are associated significantly with academic stress for male and female international students independently and differently. Males with academic stress and females without academic stress experience the most benefits from social support whereas females with academic stress experienced no benefit from social support as indicated by the SPS. The results of this study indicate that there are broad implications for individuals who interact with international students on a personal, professional and academic level.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentix, 114 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc513983781eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6133
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6133eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshStudents, Foreign -- Social networkseng
dc.subject.lcshStudents, Foreign -- Psychologyeng
dc.subject.lcshStress (Psychology)eng
dc.titleThe effects of gender, academic concerns, and social support on stress for international studentseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineSocial work (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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