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dc.contributor.advisorBooth, Frank W.eng
dc.contributor.authorLaye, Matthew James, 1981-eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Springeng
dc.description"May 2009"eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2009.eng
dc.description.abstractThe increased prevalence of obesity and diabetes threatens both the real and economic health of Western counties. There were two major goals of this dissertation, 1) to determine if in response to inactivity and hyperphagia there is a decrease in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondria concentration in WAT, similar to skeletal muscle and liver and 2) to determine if physical active and sedentary mice have differentially methylated DNA in skeletal muscle. First, (chapter 2) I established that the increase in abdominal WAT during inactivity occurs even when food intake is restricted to the level of always-sedentary animals. A follow-up study (chapter 3) showed that the increase in WAT is not associated with a decrease in acid oxidation adipocytes fatty. Markers of WAT mitochondrial protein content (cytochrome c, COXIV-subunit I, and citrate synthase activity) significantly increased from 13 to 40 weeks in the wild type rats, were significantly attenuated in the hyperphagic sedentary rats, but were partially restored to the wild type levels with wheel running in the hyperphagic rats. Although strong evidence suggests that differences in DNA methylation in physically active and sedentary animals can occur, I was unable to verify candidate genes selected based on initial microarrays. However, two novel physical activity responsive genes were found, Dnmt3a and Pitx3. Future studies are needed to examine the feasibility of differences in DNA methylation occurring in response to physical activity. In summary, WAT oxidative phenotype is modified by aging and physical activity, while it remains unclear whether DNA methylation differences in skeletal muscle can occur.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb70510192eng
dc.identifier.oclc423668615eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6160
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6160eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshHomeostasiseng
dc.subject.lcshDNA -- Methylationeng
dc.subject.lcshAdipose tissue -- Metabolismeng
dc.subject.lcshMitochrondiaeng
dc.subject.lcshFatty acidseng
dc.subject.meshMotor Activity -- physiologyeng
dc.subject.meshHyperphagia -- metabolismeng
dc.subject.meshAdipose tissue -- Metabolismeng
dc.subject.meshDNA Methylation -- physiologyeng
dc.titleThe effects of physical activity on adipose tissue metabolism and DNA methylationeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiology (Medicine) (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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