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dc.contributor.advisorSemlitsch, Raymond D.eng
dc.contributor.authorMendez, Sara I. (Sara Inga), 1979-eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb 15, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Raymond D. Semlitscheng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009eng
dc.description.abstractHormones play an important role in shaping growth and development. Endocrine disrupting contaminants (EDCs) come from the external environment and can mimic or block internal hormone pathways. Many amphibians begin to develop major body systems, both reproductive and non-reproductive, while they are aquatic larvae. Because this critical period of development occurs in water, amphibian larvae can also be exposed to and surrounded by EDCs that find their way into the water via direct spraying, surface water runoff, and even rainfall. Further, as they metamorphose into terrestrial juveniles, they are subject to exposure on land, especially in agricultural landscapes. The main objective of my research was to investigate how low, ecologically relevant concentrations of EDCs (atrazine, estradiol) could impact both reproductive and non-reproductive endpoints, and further, how these effects might impact amphibian population persistence. The results presented in my thesis make important contributions to the literature in both reproductive and non-reproductive chemical exposure assessments. Moreover, this research emphasizes the importance of examining both aquatic and terrestrial exposure as well as reproductive and non-reproductive endpoints when investigating the impacts of EDC exposure on individuals and on population persistence.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentxi, 113 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc520968555eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6183
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6183eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.sourceSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshEndocrine toxicologyeng
dc.subject.lcshReproductive toxicologyeng
dc.subject.lcshEnvironmental toxicologyeng
dc.subject.lcshAnura -- Effect of water pollution oneng
dc.subject.lcshAnura -- Effect of pollution oneng
dc.titleAquatic and terrestrial exposure of amphibians to estrogenic endocrine disrupting contaminantseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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