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dc.contributor.advisorForgács, Gabor, 1949-eng
dc.contributor.authorNorotte, Cyrille, 1983-eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb 15, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Gabor Forgacs.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh.D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biological sciences.eng
dc.description.abstractCardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death and often requires vascular reconstruction. However, the use of synthetic materials and scaffold-based approaches has shown several limitations for small-diameter blood vessel tissue-engineering, evidenced by the fact that they can elicit adverse host responses and interfere with, rather than guide, direct cellcell interaction as well as assembly and alignment of cell-produced extracellular matrix. Understanding the physical principles of biological self-assembly is thus essential for developing efficient strategies to build living tissues and organs. Here we exploit well-established liquid-like developmental processes (such as tissue fusion, envelopment or cell-sorting phenomena) to engineer scaffold-free, multilayered, small-diameter blood vessels. In particular, we show that apparent surface tensions of the three major vascular cell types (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts), determined through the exact solution of Laplace equation, guide their segregation in a multilayered fashion in vitro. Moreover, we introduce a novel rapid-prototyping technology (bioprinting) that allows for directing the self-assembly of the vascular cell types into custom-shaped tubular tissue structures, from single vascular tubes to complex hierarchical macrovascular trees. In addition to its potential for fulfilling the crucial need for small diameter vascular grafts and providing new strategies for vascularization of tissues for transplantation, this physically based approach provides a new insight into cell-patterning and structure formation and questions the paradigm of scaffold-based tissue-engineering.eng
dc.format.extentx, 92 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc518432180eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6188
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6188eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshTissue engineeringeng
dc.subject.lcshCardiovascular system -- Diseaseseng
dc.subject.lcshBlood-vesselseng
dc.titleFrom developmental biology to tissue-engineering: printing blood vesselseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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