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dc.contributor.advisorWalker, Mary P.
dc.contributor.advisorNickel, Jeffrey C. (Jeffrey Charles), 1957-
dc.contributor.authorGreenburg, Mark
dc.date.issued2017
dc.date.submitted2017 Fall
dc.descriptionVita
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 31-33)
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.)--School of Dentistry. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2017
dc.descriptionThesis advisors: Mary P. Walker and Jeff Nickel
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this project was to determine what demographic factors, if any, lead to private practice orthodontists creating digital models and then taking the additional step of using these models in treatment planning. A 22-question survey, approved by the UMKC IRB, was constructed and distributed to 2,300 private practice orthodontists by email through the American Association of Orthodontists Partners in Research program. Orthodontic residency graduation year, gender, primary office location, and the use of other digital health records were just a few of the demographics examined in the survey. The survey was divided into two domains, orthodontist demographics and orthodontic office demographics. Additional questions addressed observational items such as the likes and dislikes of the software the orthodontist is currently using. Demographic factors were coded and one-way ANOVA testing was performed with a significance level of α = 0.05. Overall, this study found a statistically significant association between orthodontist and orthodontic office demographics with the practitioner creating digital models and using of these models in treatment planning. In particular, recent orthodontic residents were more likely to create digital models. Orthodontists in certain geographic regions and that used digital dental records were also more likely to create digital models. No other statistically significant results were found and no factors showed a significant association with digital treatment planning; however, the majority of the respondents did create digital models. Observational questions revealed that cost and the preference for plaster models were the two main reasons orthodontists did not use digital models. Another interesting observation was that several orthodontists felt that photographs eliminate the need for models. This survey revealed that the top four programs used for digital models and treatment planning were OrthoCAD®, OrthoTrac®, Invisalign® ClinCheck®, and SureSmile®.eng
dc.description.tableofcontentsIntroduction -- Materials and methods -- Results -- Discussion -- Conclusions -- Appendix A. Survey -- Appendix B, Focus group evaluation form -- Appendix C. Survey email prompt -- Appendix D. Informed script for survey -- Appendix E. IRB approval letter -- Appendix F. Composite score
dc.description.versionTitle from PDF of title page, viewed December 13, 2017
dc.format.extentix, 52 pages
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/62215
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Kansas Cityeng
dc.subject.lcshComputer simulation
dc.subject.lcshOrthodontics
dc.subject.meshComputer Simulation
dc.subject.meshOrthodontics -- trends
dc.subject.otherThesis -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Dentistry
dc.titleThe Use of Digital Study Models and Perceptions Towards Existing Digital Model Software in Orthodontic Practiceeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineOral and Craniofacial Sciences (UMKC)
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Kansas City
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameM.S.


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