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dc.contributor.advisorFinfgeld-Connetteng
dc.contributor.authorSnyder, Brianaeng
dc.date.issued2017eng
dc.date.submitted2017 Springeng
dc.description.abstractAbuse and neglect are global phenomena with devastating personal, familial, and societal effects. When occurring in childhood, maltreatment increases the risk for additional abuse experiences across the lifespan. This purpose of this review is to summarize and analyze current research about the relationship between the experience of child maltreatment (CM) and intimate partner violence (IPV) in adulthood. The majority of literature supports that CM increases the risk for IPV, and the link appears to be stronger in specific populations, including female veterans, teens, sexual minorities, and individuals with mental illness. Nurse-midwives are uniquely poised to prevent and address this maltreatment, due to the intimate nature of the care they provide to clients and their families, but continue to encounter barriers in practice. Nurse-midwives need additional resources and training related to abuse, and they must take an active role in assessing, treating, providing resources, and making appropriate referrals to interprofessional colleagues. Keywords: child abuse, child maltreatment, intimate partner violence, domestic violence, spousal abuseeng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/62260
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.subject.FASTMultiple personalityeng
dc.subject.FASTIntimate partner violenceeng
dc.titleViews of women with dissociative identity disorder on intimate partner violence: a grounded theory approacheng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineNursing (MU)eng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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