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dc.contributor.advisorTriplett, Gregory Edward, 1973-eng
dc.contributor.authorModi, Nihareng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionMU: Access is limited to the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.descriptionThesis supervisor: Dr. Gregory Triplett.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb. 16, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Electrical and computer engineering.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2007.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Due to the advancement of nanotechnology, understanding the heat transport mechanism in nano-scale devices has become a crucial factor in describing the operation of the device. Laser diode structures have been the backbone for optoelectronic systems over the years. They are widely being used in state of art communication systems. Laser diodes are also used in defense applications as target defining device and in commercial applications as barcode readers and optical storage devices. However, thermal characteristics have been a deterring factor for their greater use. Hence, investigating thermal management in laser diode structures becomes an important and interesting study for current and future laser applications. In this research, thermal characteristics of laser diode structures were studied in detail. Factors such as thermal resistance and facet temperature, which affect the thermal properties of a laser diode structure, were analyzed in depth. Catastrophic optical damage (COD), which is a failure mode in a semiconductor laser due to high of power densities, was discussed in depth. In order, to understand the heat flow, a laser diode structure was modeled using Coventorware. Heat flux profiles extracted from the model clearly show that active region was fastest to get heated up as the absorption takes place in this region. Temperature profiles also show that the top surface of the laser diode structure reaches 800[degree sign]K which is one of the main reasons for COD in laser diode structures. This model could be further implemented with different material properties to study laser diodes emitting different wavelengths. Moreover, the model can also be modified to study the thermal properties in a quantum cascade laser diode which is one of the active areas of research. Cooling mechanisms such as heat sink and heat spreaders can also be integrated in the design to improve the thermal properties of a laser diode structure.--From public.pdfeng
dc.format.extentviii, 84 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc517985343eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6262
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6262eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshSemiconductor lasers -- Thermal propertieseng
dc.subject.lcshDiodes, Semiconductor -- Thermal propertieseng
dc.subject.lcshGallium arsenide semiconductors -- Thermal propertieseng
dc.titleThermal management in GaAs/AlGaAs laser diode structureseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and computer engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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