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dc.contributor.advisorCohn, Leah A.eng
dc.contributor.authorDeClue, Amy E.eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.description"August 2007"eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Veterinary medicine and surgery.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Previous studies have shown that ketamine attenuates endotoxin (LPS)-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[alpha] in murine models. Because TNF-[alpha] is a key mediator of the systemic and pulmonary inflammatory response to infection, we hypothesized that ketamine would ameliorate LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and prevent the hemodynamic and immunologic alterations in dogs. Forty male CD rats were divided into 4 treatment groups: control, ketamine, LPS and LPS+ ketamine. Rats were euthanized at either 1 or 6 hours after LPS administration for determination of serum TNF-[alpha] activity or pulmonary evaluation. Ketamine treatment blunted LPSinduced serum TNF-[alpha] activity but did not ameliorate the pulmonary histopathologic changes associated with endotoxemia. For the second study, nine dogs were randomized to either ketamine or placebo treatment groups in a cross-over design. At 30 min, LPS was administered. Heart rate (HR), systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP), plasma TNF-[alpha] activity and white blood cell (WBC) counts were evaluated. Dogs in the ketamine group had significantly lower HR and peak plasma TNF-[alpha] activity after LPS administration versus placebo. There were no differences detected between treatment groups for SAP or white blood cell counts. Based on these data, while ketamine ameliorates TNF-[alpha] production in rats and dogs, it is unlikely to have a clinically important impact on the development of acute lung injury, perturbations in WBC count or SAP during Gram negative sepsis.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb61468484eng
dc.identifier.oclc182537868eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6276
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6276eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2007 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshKetamine -- Physiological effecteng
dc.subject.lcshTumor necrosis factoreng
dc.subject.lcshRats as laboratory animalseng
dc.subject.lcshDogs as laboratory animalseng
dc.titleKetamine immunomodulation during endotoxemiaeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary medicine and surgery (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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