[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorOcceña, Luis G.eng
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Kyle, 1983-eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb. 19, 2008).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDr. Luis Occeña, Thesis Supervisor.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Industrial engineering.eng
dc.description.abstractThere has been some promising research in the use of RFID technology to ensure that medical sponges are not mistakenly left in surgical patients--estimated to occur once in every 10,000 open cavity surgeries. However, the issues of human error and retained sponges were raised during trials. I propose to research the possibility of having a continuously scanning RFID system. This system would eliminate the human interaction of the current handheld scanning devices. With the human interaction no longer a factor in the process, scanning the cavity too early to detect all of the sponges used or scanning at a distance too great for the tags to be read will no longer be of any concern. RFID tags also have the possibility to assist in decreasing the number of wrong-site surgery occurrences--estimated at one in every 112,994 operations. Each patient would have an RFID tag with a unique identification number corresponding to a database with his or her procedure information. The tag will be scanned when the patient enters the operating room and the corresponding information will then be displayed. The proof-of-concept research performed shows promising findings that it is possible to have a continuously scanning RFID system for the detection of surgical sponges. The paper also describes the development of a software program that utilizes RFID tags to increase the availability of information in the operating room to decrease the chances of wrong-site surgeries. Further development will need to be performed before either proposal can have a clinical trial.eng
dc.format.extentix, 47 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc535594252eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6284
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6284eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2008 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2008 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshRadio frequency identification systemseng
dc.subject.lcshSurgeons -- Malpractice -- Preventioneng
dc.titleThe use of radio frequency identification (RFID) in tracking surgical sponges and reducing wrong-site surgerieseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial and manufacturing systems engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record