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dc.contributor.advisorZhang, Shuqun, 1970-eng
dc.contributor.authorHan, Ling, 1981-eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb. 12, 2008).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDr. Shuqun Zhang, Thesis Supervisor.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biochemistry.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Ethylene (C[subscript2]H[subscript 4]), a simple gaseous hydrocarbon, is an important plant hormone that has profound effects on plant growth, development, and response to environmental stimuli. Ethylene induces the ripening of climacteric fruits, which is characterized by a steep increase in ethylene synthesis at the mature stage. In agriculture, removal of ethylene in hypobaric storage compartments prevents fruits from spoilage. Now fruit ripening can also be controlled by manipulating ethylene synthesis. Moreover, induced ethylene production is an early response of plants after pathogen attack, and is an important component of plant defense response to pathogens. All ethylene-regulated processes begin with the induction of ethylene biosynthesis. The committing and generally rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis in plants is catalyzed by a labile enzyme, ACC synthase (ACS). My research was focused on the regulation of ACS by a specific signaling pathway under various stimuli. We uncovered that three ACS isoforms are essential for pathogen-induced ethylene production. Their loss-of-function mutants lose 90% of elevated ethylene synthesis relative to wild type plants, and probably many other defense responses as well. We also found that a regulation pathway was involved in this process. Our finding will definitely bring new insights to the understanding the fight between plants and pathogens. Moreover, the loss of ethylene induction will be a great help for the study of other co-products in ethylene biosynthesis.--From public.pdfeng
dc.format.extentxiii, 88 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc535576343eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6293
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6293eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshEthylene -- Synthesis -- Researcheng
dc.subject.lcshArabidopsis -- Geneticseng
dc.titleRegulation of ethylene biosynthesis by mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in Arabidopsiseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiochemistry (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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