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dc.contributor.advisorHudson, Berkleyeng
dc.contributor.authorJaeckels, Beckieeng
dc.contributor.sponsorUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Librarieseng
dc.date.issued2017eng
dc.descriptionIncludes research/process statement.eng
dc.descriptionBeckie Jaeckels won first prize and a $500 scholarship for her paper “Written in Stone: A Critical Look at the Nation’s Dealings with Racial Discussion in 2017.” Her paper is structured around her work with Dr. Berkley Hudson as a Discovery Fellow. Dr. Berkley describes the paper as an exploration of “the twists and turns that have led to today’s debate about the role and the legitimacy of monuments dedicated to the Confederacy and its Lost Cause and those connections with enslavement and with contemporary racial strife and brutality.” Beckie cites a wide variety of 38 primary and secondary sources, from traditional print sources to tweets.--University Libraries News (April 3, 2018).eng
dc.description.abstractOne of the prizes for the 2018 Undergraduate Research Paper Contest was awarded for this paper by Beckie Jaeckels. From the first paragraph: "There are few moments in which history aligns with present discourse in an uncannily beautiful fashion. Dr. Berkley Hudson at the University of Missouri--Columbia School of Journalism can testify to this stumble of fate. Hudson is presently on research leave, working on a project to which he has been dedicated for the entirety of his academic life: the photography of O.N. Pruitt, a jack-of-all-trades photographer from Mississippi. I have been working with him since August 2016 as a research assistant and Discovery Fellow. Over those many months, I have become immersed in the setting of 20th century Mississippi. I thought I knew the extent of Pruitt's documentary photography. But paging through a rough copy of a collection of Pruitt's work, there was cause to stop: the word "Confederate" stood out strikingly clear on the glossed page. Only days prior, the alt-right and white nationalists had gathered under the pretense of protesting the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville, Virginia. Since then, discussion about where Confederate statues and memorials belonged had been reinvigorated. On this page sat a photograph taken by O.N. Pruitt of a monument commemorating the lives of those who fought in the Battle of Tupelo "both Confederate and Union."eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/63019
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.relation.ispartofUndergraduate Research Paper Contest (MU)eng
dc.titleWritten in stone : a critical look at the nation's dealings with racial discussion in 2017eng
dc.typePapereng


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